November 5, 2021 Paul Glantz, CPA

IRS announces 401(k) limit increases to $20,500

The contribution limit for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan has been increased from $19,500 to $20,500 beginning with the 2022 calendar year.

Additionally, the income ranges for determining eligibility to make deductible contributions to traditional Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs), to contribute to Roth IRAs, and to claim the Saver’s Credit have also all increased for 2022.

Below are the updated phase-out ranges for IRA contributions in 2022:

Single Taxpayers

For single taxpayers covered by a workplace retirement plan (even if only for a portion of the year), the phase-out range is increased to $68,000 to $78,000, up from $66,000 to $76,000.

Married Filing Jointly Taxpayers

If the spouse making the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is increased to $109,000 to $129,000, up from $105,000 to $125,000.

If the spouse making the IRA contributor is not covered by a workplace retirement plan but is married to someone who is covered, the phase-out range is increased to $204,000 to $214,000, up from $198,000 to $208,000.

Married Filing Separately Taxpayers

If a taxpayer is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

Roth IRAs

The income phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is increased to $129,000 to $144,000 for single and head of household taxpayers, up from $125,000 to $140,000. For married couples filing jointly, the income phase-out range is increased to $204,000 to $214,000, up from $198,000 to $208,000. The phase-out range for a married individual filing a separate return who makes contributions to a Roth IRA is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

Simple IRAs

The amount individuals can contribute to their SIMPLE retirement accounts is increased to $14,000, up from $13,500.

Key employee contribution limits that remain unchanged

The limit on annual contributions to an IRA (Roth or Traditional) remains unchanged at $6,000. The IRA catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $1,000, for a maximum contribution amount of $7,000.

The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan remains unchanged at $6,500. Therefore, participants in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan who are 50 and older can contribute up to $27,000, starting in 2022. The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in SIMPLE plans remains unchanged at $3,000.

Details on these and other retirement-related cost-of-living adjustments for 2022 are in Notice 2021-61, available on IRS.gov.

Tagged: ,

About the Author

Paul Glantz, CPA Paul Glantz is a Certified Public Accountant licensed in both Texas and New York. Paul has an extensive background in public accounting with a specific focus on individual, fiduciary, and business taxation. Paul currently resides in Austin, Texas.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *