IRS issues standard mileage rates for 2019

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today issued the 2019 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2019, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

  • 58 cents per mile driven for business use, up 3.5 cents from the rate for 2018,
  • 20 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes, up 2 cents from the rate for 2018, and
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations.

The business mileage rate increased 3.5 cents for business travel driven and 2 cents for medical and certain moving expense from the rates for 2018. The charitable rate is set by statute and remains unchanged.

It is important to note that under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, taxpayers cannot claim a miscellaneous itemized deduction for unreimbursed employee travel expenses. Taxpayers also cannot claim a deduction for moving expenses, except members of the Armed Forces on active duty moving under orders to a permanent change of station. For more details see Notice-2019-02.

The standard mileage rate for business use is based on an annual study of the fixed and variable costs of operating an automobile. The rate for medical and moving purposes is based on the variable costs.

Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.

A taxpayer may not use the business standard mileage rate for a vehicle after using any depreciation method under the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) or after claiming a Section 179 deduction for that vehicle. In addition, the business standard mileage rate cannot be used for more than four vehicles used simultaneously. These and other limitations are described in section 4.05 of Rev. Proc. 2010-51.

Notice 2018-02, posted today on IRS.gov, contains the standard mileage rates, the amount a taxpayer must use in calculating reductions to basis for depreciation taken under the business standard mileage rate, and the maximum standard automobile cost that a taxpayer may use in computing the allowance under a fixed and variable rate plan.

Tax reform expands availability of cash accounting

Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), many more businesses are now eligible to use the cash method of accounting for federal tax purposes. The cash method offers greater tax-planning flexibility, allowing some businesses to defer taxable income. Newly eligible businesses should determine whether the cash method would be advantageous and, if so, consider switching methods.

Read more

Recent Developments That May Affect Your Tax Situation

The following is a summary of important tax developments that have occurred in July, August, and September that may affect you, your family, your investments, and your livelihood. Please call Launch Consulting Inc at 512-666-0729 for more information about any of these developments and what steps you should implement to take advantage of favorable developments and to minimize the impact of those that are unfavorable.

IRS shoots down states’ SALT limitation workaround. For 2018 through 2025, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) limits an individual taxpayer’s annual SALT (state and local tax) deductions to a maximum of $10,000, with no carryover for taxes paid in excess of that amount. (The SALT deduction limit doesn’t apply to property taxes paid by a trade or business or in connection with the production of income.) As a result of this change, many taxpayers will not get a full federal income tax deduction for their payments of state and local taxes. Following the TCJA’s passage, some high-tax states implemented workarounds to mitigate the effect of the SALT deduction limit for their residents. One method used was the establishment of charitable funds to which taxpayers can contribute and receive a tax credit in exchange. The IRS has issued proposed regulations, which would apply to contributions after Aug. 27, 2018, that effectively kill this workaround. The regulations would provide that a taxpayer who makes payments to or transfers property to an entity eligible to receive tax deductible contributions must reduce his or her charitable deduction by the amount of any state or local tax credit the taxpayer receives or expects to receive.

IRS also clarified that the proposed regulation crackdown on the SALT limitation workaround doesn’t apply to businesses. In other words, a business generally can deduct a payment to a charitable or governmental entity if the payment is made with a business purpose.

IRS clarifies who is a qualifying relative for family credit purposes. Under the TCJA, effective for tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017 and before Jan. 1, 2026, you can’t claim a dependency exemption for dependents, including qualifying relatives, but you may be eligible for a $2,000 credit for each qualifying child and a $500 credit (called the “family credit”) for each qualifying non-child dependent, including qualifying relatives. One of the conditions for being a qualifying relative is that the person’s gross income for the year can’t be more than the exemption amount. That condition remains the same in the Tax Code, but the exemption amount has been reduced to zero because the dependency exemption has has been eliminated. The IRS has clarified that the gross income limit for a qualifying relative for tax credit purposes (as well as for other purposes, such as head-of-household status), is determined by reference to what the exemption amount would have been if it hadn’t been reduced to zero by the TCJA. Thus, after 2017 and before 2026, the gross income limit is $4,150, adjusted for inflation after 2018.

IRS explains 20% deduction for qualified business income. The IRS has issued regulations on the new 20% deduction for qualified business income (QBI) created by the TCJA, also known as the pass-through deduction. Here’s a summary of the basic rules:

For tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017, taxpayers other than corporations may be entitled to a deduction of up to 20% of their qualified business income (QBI) from a domestic business operated as a sole proprietorship, or through a partnership, S corporation, trust or estate. This deduction can be taken in addition to the standard or itemized deductions.

In general, the deduction is equal to the lesser of:

A. 20% of QBI plus 20% of qualified real estate investment trust (REIT) dividends and qualified publicly traded partnership (PTP) income, or
B. 20% of taxable income minus net capital gains.

QBI generally is the net amount of qualified items of income, gain, deduction, and loss, from any qualified trade or business. But QBI doesn’t include capital gains and losses, certain dividends and interest income, reasonable compensation paid to the taxpayer by any qualified trade or business for services rendered for that trade or business, and any guaranteed payment to a partner for services to the business.

Generally, the deduction for QBI can’t be more than the greater of:

a. 50% of the W-2 wages from the qualified trade or business; or
b. 25% of the W-2 wages from the qualified trade or business plus 2.5% of the unadjusted basis of certain tangible, depreciable property held and used by the business during the year for production of QBI.

But this limit on the deduction for QBI doesn’t apply to taxpayers with taxable income below a threshold amount ($315,000 for married individuals filing jointly, $157,500 for other individuals, indexed for inflation after 2018), with a phase-in for taxable income over this amount.

A qualified trade or business doesn’t include performing services as an employee. Additionally, a qualified trade or business doesn’t include a trade or business involving the performance of services in the fields of health, law, accounting, actuarial science, performing arts, consulting, athletics, financial services, investing and investment management, trading, dealing in certain assets or any trade or business where the principal asset is the reputation or skill of one or more of its employees. This exception only applies if a taxpayer’s taxable income exceeds $315,000 for a married couple filing a joint return, or $157,500 for all other taxpayers; the benefit of the deduction is phased out for taxable income over this amount.

The IRS’s new regulations explaining the 20% deduction for QBI are highly detailed and complex. A sampling of the important guidance contained in the guidance follows:
• Partnership guaranteed payments are not considered attributable to a trade or business and thus do not constitute QBI.
• To the extent that any previously disallowed losses or deductions are allowed in the tax year, they are treated as items attributable to the trade or business for that tax year. But this rule doesn’t apply for losses or deductions that were disallowed for tax years beginning before Jan. 1, 2018; they are not taken into account for purposes of computing QBI in a later tax year.
• Generally, a deduction for a net operating loss (NOL) is not considered attributable to a trade or business and therefore,is not taken into account in computing QBI. However, to the extent the NOL is comprised of amounts attributable to a trade or business that were disallowed under a specialized excess business loss limitation for noncorporate taxpayers, the NOL is considered attributable to that trade or business.
• Interest income received on working capital, reserves, and similar accounts is not properly allocable to a trade or business. In contrast, interest income received on accounts or notes receivable for services or goods provided by the trade or business is not income from assets held for investment, but income received on assets acquired in the ordinary course of trade or business.
• The 20% deduction for QBI does not reduce net earnings from self-employment or net investment income under the rules for the 3.8% surtax on net investment income.
• Where a business (or a major portion of it, or a separate unit of it) is bought or sold during the year, the W-2 wages of the individual or entity for the calendar year of the acquisition or disposition are allocated between each individual or entity based on the period during which the employees of the acquired or disposed-of trade or business were employed by the individual or entity.
• The rule generally barring a health services business from being a qualified trade or business doesn’t include the provision of services not directly related to a medical field, even though the services may purportedly relate to the health of the service recipient. For example, the performance of services in the field of health does not include the operation of health clubs or health spas that provide physical exercise or conditioning to their customers, payment processing, or research, testing, and manufacture and/or sales of pharmaceuticals or medical devices.
• The rule generally barring the performance of services in the field of actuarial science from being a qualified trade or business does not include the provision of services by analysts, economists, mathematicians, and statisticians not engaged in analyzing or assessing the financial costs of risk or uncertainty of events.
• The rule barring consulting from being a qualified trade or business doesn’t apply to consulting that is embedded in, or ancillary to, the sale of goods if there is no separate payment for the consulting services. For example, a company that sells computers may provide customers with consulting services relating to the setup, operation, and repair of the computers, or a contractor who remodels homes may provide consulting prior to remodeling a kitchen.

Bonus depreciation may be claimed for used property. The TCJA boosted the first-year bonus depreciation allowance from 50% to 100% for qualified property acquired and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017 and before Jan. 1, 2023. That means a business can write off the cost of most machinery and equipment in the year it’s placed in service. And, for the first time ever, for property acquired and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017, bonus depreciation may be claimed for used as well as new equipment. The IRS has explained that used equipment and machinery qualifies for the 100% bonus first-year depreciation allowance if: the taxpayer (or a predecessor) didn’t use the property at any time before the acquisition; the property wasn’t acquired from a related party or from a component member of a controlled corporate group; and the taxpayer’s basis in the used property isn’t figured by reference to the basis of the property in the hands of the seller or transferor.

Form W-4 for 2019 will be similar to 2018 version. The IRS has announced that the 2019 version of the Form W-4 (Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate) will be similar to the current 2018 version. IRS had earlier issued a draft W-4 for 2019 that was longer than the 2018 version and more complex due to changes made by the TCJA. Bowing to complaints that the proposed changes to the form were too confusing and too complicated, the IRS relented and announced that the Form W-4 for 2019 will be similar to the current 2018 version.

Simplified per-diem increase for post-Sept. 30, 2018 travel. An employer may pay a per-diem amount to an employee on business-travel status instead of reimbursing actual substantiated expenses for away-from-home lodging, meal and incidental expenses (M&E). If the rate paid doesn’t exceed the IRS-approved maximums, and the employee provides simplified substantiation, the reimbursement isn’t subject to income- or payroll-tax withholding and isn’t reported on the employee’s Form W-2. Instead of using actual per-diems, employers may use a simplified “high-low” per-diem, under which there is one uniform per-diem rate for all “high-cost” areas within the continental U.S. (CONUS), and another per-diem rate for all other areas within CONUS. The IRS released the “high-low” simplified per-diem rates for post-Sept. 30, 2018, travel. Under the optional high-low method for post-Sept. 30, 2018 travel, the high-cost-area per diem is $287 (up from $284), consisting of $216 for lodging and $71 for M&IE. The per-diem for all other localities is $195 (up from $191), consisting of $135 for lodging and $60 for M&IE.

Now’s the time to review your business expenses

As we approach the end of the year, it’s a good idea to review your business’s expenses for deductibility. At the same time, consider whether your business would benefit from accelerating certain expenses into this year.

Be sure to evaluate the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), which reduces or eliminates many deductions. In some cases, it may be necessary or desirable to change your expense and reimbursement policies.

What’s deductible, anyway?

There’s no master list of deductible business expenses in the Internal Revenue Code (IRC). Although some deductions are expressly authorized or excluded, most are governed by the general rule of IRC Sec. 162, which permits businesses to deduct their “ordinary and necessary” expenses.

An ordinary expense is one that is common and accepted in your industry. A necessary expense is one that is helpful and appropriate for your business. (It need not be indispensable.) Even if an expense is ordinary and necessary, it may not be deductible if the IRS considers it lavish or extravagant.

What did the TCJA change?

The TCJA contains many provisions that affect the deductibility of business expenses. Significant changes include these deductions:

Meals and entertainment. The act eliminates most deductions for entertainment expenses, but retains the 50% deduction for business meals. What about business meals provided in connection with nondeductible entertainment? In a recent notice, the IRS clarified that such meals continue to be 50% deductible, provided they’re purchased separately from the entertainment or their cost is separately stated on invoices or receipts.

Transportation. The act eliminates most deductions for qualified transportation fringe benefits, such as parking, vanpooling and transit passes. This change may lead some employers to discontinue these benefits, although others will continue to provide them because 1) they’re a valuable employee benefit (they’re still tax-free to employees) or 2) they’re required by local law.

Employee expenses. The act suspends employee deductions for unreimbursed job expenses — previously treated as miscellaneous itemized deductions — through 2025. Some businesses may want to implement a reimbursement plan for these expenses. So long as the plan meets IRS requirements, reimbursements are deductible by the business and tax-free to employees.

Need help?

The deductibility of certain expenses, such as employee wages or office supplies, is obvious. In other cases, it may be necessary to consult IRS rulings or court cases for guidance.

For questions about tax deductions specific to your business, give Launch Consulting a call today.

The Ultimate Guide to Estimated Taxes (Form 1040-ES)

A common question I receive from small business owners is “how do I calculate my quarterly tax payments?” At the heart of this question is the fear of ending up like Al Capone. I hope to alleviate those fears and provide you with this ultimate guide to estimated taxes.

First, what are estimated taxes? Estimated taxes are payments of tax on income that is not subject to withholding. The most common types of income that are not subject to withholding are self-employment income, business income, rental income, and investment income.

Am I required to make estimated tax payments? You may be required to make estimated tax payments if you expect to owe over $1,000 in federal taxes after subtracting out federal tax withholding and credits.

Is there a difference between “ES taxes” and “Estimated Taxes”? Nope! They are the same. Sometimes estimated taxes are referred to as “ES” taxes because individuals would send payment with Form 1040-ES.

When are estimated taxes due? Estimated taxes are due in four installments, usually on the following dates:

  • 1st Quarter – April 15
  • 2nd Quarter – June 15
  • 3rd Quarter – September 15
  • 4th Quarter – January 15

Does the IRS have to receive my payment by the due date if I mail my check with Form 1040-ES? Nope! The IRS will consider your payment timely if postmarked by the due date.

How do I calculate estimated taxes? I like to break estimated tax calculations into two categories – safe-harbor calculations or actual calculations. The safe harbor provision states that as long as you pay 100% of the prior year tax liability (110%, if your AGI was >$150,000 in the prior year) or 90% of the current year tax, you can likely avoid any penalty on potential under payment. While you may owe additional tax come April 15th, this makes ES calculations much more simple!

Where do I find my prior year Adjusted Gross Income (AGI)? Your adjusted gross income can be found on Form 1040, Line 37 (for 2015).

Where do I find the total tax paid last year? The total tax paid in the previous year can be found on Form 1040, Line 63 (for 2015)

I’m still confused about this safe-harbor non-sense, elaborate! If you expect income (and therefore taxes) to increase year after year, you can simply take last years total tax, subtract out any year-to-date withholding (your spouses withholding from their job as an employee, for instance), and divide by 4.

Here’s an example: Last year, the total tax on Line 63 was $40,000. You work freelance and your spouse works as employee. Your spouse’s federal income tax withholding on their paycheck for the current year is $2,500/month or $30,000 for the year. Your business is growing, and just by looking at your financials on QuickBooks you see that you are on pace to increase net profit by 20% for the year! You know that you will owe more in tax, but you would prefer to hold on to the money for short-term capital needs or an equipment purchase, so you decide to make a safe harbor payment. Since your AGI was greater than $150,000 for the prior year, you will need to have a minimum of $44,000 ($40,000 x 110%) of federal taxes paid in for the current year to avoid penalty.  We subtract the amount your spouse will have in withholding, and arrive at $14,000 ($44,000 “safeharbor” tax that needs to be paid in at a minimum, less $30,000 estimated withholding from your spouses paycheck). We divide the $14,000 by 4, to arrive at $3,500. We will make four $3,500 tax deposits by each quarterly due date. Please note, this doesn’t necessarily mean you won’t owe any additional tax at the year of the year, but it does mean you will not owe any interest or penalty for underpayment of taxes.

I know it’s not that easy, do you have any other resources with examples? Okay, maybe your right, maybe estimated taxes are a little more complex than I am making them out to be. The IRS does try to simplify the process and put out instructions and resources on the topic. Estimated tax worksheets and instructions from the IRS website can be found here.

When should I use the safe-harbor provisions and when should I do an actual estimate? I recommend using the prior year tax safe-harbor calculation if you expect taxes to increase from the prior year. The current year safe harbor (90% of the current year tax) is ideal for individuals that may have had a high paying job prior to becoming a consultant or self-employed, and expect their tax liability to decrease significantly. Occasionally, we will calculate an actual tax due amount – if a client has a large unusual transaction, such as a investment property disposal, a large stock transaction, option exercise, or company exit OR if the individual prefers to not owe any tax at the end of the year.

What about Self-Employment taxes? Yikes! The dreaded self-employment tax. If you are subject to the self-employment tax, and want to use the current year safe harbor (paying 90% of the current year tax, as opposed to 100/110% of the prior year tax), refer to the worksheets on the IRS website previously mentioned.

How do I make estimated tax payments? You can make estimated tax payments by mailing Form 1040-ES with a check, using DirectPay on the IRS website, or EFTPS with the Treasury Department.

Do you have any other tips? That’s all I have for now – if you have questions, feel free to leave them in the comments!

If this post was helpful, feel free to share it with your friends! Since quarterlies are often overlooked, individuals sometimes end up paying penalties or interest that could have been easily avoided. Why give the IRS any more than you have to?

 

 

The Sharing Economy & How It Impacts You

The IRS recently launched a new resource center on IRS.gov aimed at providing tips for individuals that are taking part in the sharing economy. The past few years, the sharing economy has changed the way people travel, commute, and vacation. With new streams of revenue from assets that individuals already possess, come new requirements to ensure individuals file accurate tax returns.

The IRS, working in conjunction with the National Taxpayer Advocate, is taking steps to provide additional information to taxpayers, including the creation of the new Sharing Economy Resource Center on IRS.gov.

To help people meet their tax reporting responsibilities, the new Sharing Economy Resource Center offers tips and resources on a variety of topics ranging from filing requirements and making quarterly estimated tax payments to self-employment taxes and special rules for reporting vacation home rentals.

Here are a few key points people involved in the sharing economy should keep in mind:

  • Taxes. Income received is generally taxable, even if the recipient does not receive a Form 1099, W-2 or some other income statement. This is true if the sharing economy activity is only part-time or a sideline business and even if the recipient is paid in cash. On the other hand, depending upon the circumstances, some or all business expenses may be deductible.
  • Deductions. There are some simplified options available for deducting many business expenses for those who qualify. For example, a person who uses his or her car for business often qualifies to claim the standard mileage rate, currently 54 cents a mile for 2016.
  • Rentals. Special rules generally apply to the rental of a home, apartment or other dwelling unit that is used by the taxpayer as a residence during the taxable year. Usually, rental income must be reported in full, any expenses need to be divided between personal and business purposes and special deduction limits apply. But if the dwelling unit is rented out fewer than 15 days during the year, none of the rental income is reportable and none of the rental expenses are deductible.
  • Estimated Payments. The U.S. tax system is pay-as-you-go, based on the wherewithal to pay. This means that people involved in the sharing economy often need to make estimated tax payments during the year to cover their tax obligation. These payments are due on April 15, June 15, Sept. 15 and Jan. 15. Use Form 1040-ES to figure these payments.
  • Payment Options. The fastest and easiest way to make estimated tax payments is to do so electronically using IRS Direct Pay or the Treasury Department’s Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS).
  • Withholding. Alternatively, people involved in the sharing economy who are employees at another job can often avoid needing to make estimated tax payments by having more tax withheld from their paychecks. File Form W-4 with the employer to request additional withholding. The Withholding Calculator on IRS.gov can also be a helpful resource.

If you have any questions about how the sharing economy may impact your taxes, feel free to contact our office.

 

Three Tips for Starting a Business

When starting a business, understanding your tax obligation is one key to business success. With the internet and the wealth of information found on the web, it’s easy to be misinformed. Hopefully this post will clear up any questions or concerns you may have when starting your business.

  1. Business Structure. One of the first decisions you will make when starting a business is deciding on a business structure. Business structures can have a huge impact on the tax liability of your operations, therefore it is always best to seek council from a CPA or lawyer. The most common forms of businesses are:
    • Sole Proprietorships
    • Partnerships
    • Corporations
    • S-Corporations
    • Limited Liability Company (LLC)
      • There are many misconceptions surrounding the LLC as a business structure.
      • Here are the facts: An LLC is a business structure that is allowed by state statute. Each state has it’s own statutes regarding the requirements for ownership. An LLC has default treatments for federal taxation that may only be changed by timely filing the correct elections. The default treatments are as follows:
        • An LLC with one member (whether individual or another business) is disregarded for federal tax purposes (but still a separate entity for employment taxes and excise taxes)
        • An LLC with two or more members is by default a partnership
      • If an LLC would like to elect a treatment other than the default, it can do so by filing Form 8832 or Form 2553. An LLC can elect to be treated as a Corporation or S-Corporation. An LLC is NOT by default, either of these entities.
  2. Business Taxes. There are four general types of taxes that businesses pay:
    • Income Tax – All business except partnerships must file an annual income tax return. Partnerships, however, file an information return.
    • Self-Employment Taxes -these are social security and medicare taxes primarily levied on individuals who work for themselves (examples would include sole proprietors, single member LLC’s where an individual is the sole owner, and in some cases, partnerships)
    • Employment Taxes – businesses with employees have a responsibility to pay and file forms related to social security taxes, medicare taxes, federal income taxes, and federal unemployment (FUTA) taxes.
    • Excise Taxes – some businesses may be required to pay excise taxes, more information on these taxes can be found on the IRS website.
  3. Employer ID Number (EIN). An EIN or Federal Tax Identification Number is used to identify a business entity. Most businesses can apply for an EIN on the IRS website free of charge. An EIN is recommended, even for sole-proprietors, to obtain a bank account and provide to vendors who may request tax information.

If you have any questions about entity selection or getting your business Launched!, feel free to contact our office or schedule a consulting meeting.

Accelerated Due Date for FinCEN Form 114

FinCEN Form 114, formerly referred to as “FBAR”, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts, is used to report a financial interest in or signature authority over a foreign financial account. The “FBAR” is due June 30 this year to report 2015 accounts, with no extensions allowed.

As part of the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015, tax years beginning after December 31, 2015 (beginning Jan 1, 2016), will be due April 15 with a maximum extension of 6 months.

The IRS has done a pretty good job with assuming this role on behalf of the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network and the Department of the Treasury. The first step they took was the electronic filing mandate a few years ago, and now, matching the deadline to the individual taxpayer deadline and adding an extension makes for a smoother filing season.

For more information on whether you may be required to file FinCEN Form 114, contact Paul Glantz, CPA at paul@launchconsultinginc.com

Due Date for Forms 1099 Quickly Approaching

Form 1099-MISC along with many other informational returns are due to recipients at the end of this month. Last year, I gave a brief outline of who may be be required to file.

Penalties for late filing range from $30-100 per late or incorrectly filed return. The maximum penalty is $250,000 per year. ($75,000 for small businesses).

These are pretty steep penalties for an informational return, and they are set to increase for the 2016 filing period ($50 for the minimum and up to $175,000 for small businesses).

 

For instructions on how to prepare Form 1099-MISC for the 2015 reporting tax year, visit the IRS website.

For information on due dates, and when and where to file, check out this IRS Publication.

If you have any questions about Form 1099-MISC contact Paul Glantz, CPA at paul@launchconsultinginc.com

Controversial Charitable Contribution Regulation Withdrawn

This past September, the IRS proposed a regulation that would require charitable organizations to collect personal information from its donors and file information returns with the IRS with this personal information for donations over $250. The IRS would, in turn, would use informational returns received from the donee to match the amounts with the social security numbers of the donors.

A few days ago, we received notice that the IRS has scrapped these regulations. (whew!) This could have only led to more paperwork for non-profit organizations and greater risks for individuals to become victims of identity theft.

As a reminder, the IRS still requires contemporaneous written acknowledgement of a contribution from a charitable organization if the donation exceeds $250.  The acknowledgement must state the amount of cash or a description (but not the value) of property other than cash contributed. The letter must also state whether the donee provided any “goods or services” in consideration for the contribution. Lastly, if the goods or services received were entirely intangible religious benefits, the letter must provide a statement to that effect.

For more information on charitable contributions, please contact Paul Glantz, CPA at paul@launchconsultinginc.com